Social Media Management Reporting for Social Media Managers

Social Media ReportingAs a Social Media Manager for a micro, small and large business, you may be asked to produce regular reports to justify the investment in Social Media.  Real social media management involves up-front organization, a streamlined system for ongoing maintenance, and measurable results. Below, we’ll offer some guidance for forming social media management reports.

Making sure that you have a clear base line produced by your in depth 360 survey including: screenshots showing engagement on social media platforms, analytics from the website, and level of sales when you start, restart or take over a social media program.

Step 1: Organize your social media efforts.

Producing a quality social media report hinges on three main areas:

  • Brand (# of mentions, shares, voice and other key insights)
  • Engagement (# of tweets, likes, shares, campaigns & engagement scores)
  • Service (# of inquiries, response times and sentiment)

As a social media manager, you are responsible for creating regular reports that demonstrate how you are implementing your social media plan. Decide what data you want to include in your reports and how frequently you want to report to your client(s). On average, most social media reports are generated weekly, quarterly and/or annually to help track and measure success.

Step 2: Deliver evidence of return on investment.

Come up with a list of measurable Key Performance Indicators (KPIs).

There are numerous ways to track the growth of your social presence, and many social networking sites actually have their own reporting that you can customize to look at certain KPIs more closely. Examples of KPIs may vary across social channels, but they may include:

  • # of followers
  • # of comments
  • # of likes
  • % engagement with posted content
  • # of re-tweets or shares

Determine which social media measuring tools to use, if any.

Today, there are countless tools available on the web to help you make sense of your social data. Not only can this be helpful; it can save you hours of raking through data manually to find what you’re looking for. The following are are a few of the online tools worth considering:

Step 3: Put your KPIs into a presentable format/report.

There are a number of ways you can pull together a report, such as:

  • Visual
    -Powerpoint presentations
    – Infographics
    – Graphs, etc.
    – Prezi.com
    – Mindmeister.com
  • Data Driven/Analytical
    – Excel spreadsheets, etc.
    – Google Docs, Spreadsheet

When presenting your information, determine whether you will be showing weekly or monthly data. Determine if you need to include comparative information on competitors, and be sure to note any week-over-week and/or monthly changes in your data reporting.

Below are some examples of different ways in which social media managers have organized their information into reports.

Social Media Report Examples:

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Social Media Report Example #1 [source]

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Social Media Report Example #2 [source]

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Social Media Report Example #3 [source]

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Social Media Report Example #4 [source]

Develop the muscle to capture as you go! 

– Always have a screen capture program active on your computer.  When you see a big win or something you may want to do in the future get a capture of it. One Manager in our class did not know their superior was deleting past posts of some of their best work on Facebook. going back in  If they had screen shots, they could have evidence of their good work. You can use Dropbox, Google Drive or even Evernote to capture this information.

In the end, responsible social media management reporting begins and ends with organization – from assessing which social media sites to build a presence on, to researching, establishing and tracking KPIs, to formulating highly organized, structured data to present to clients in a way that will reveal online social trends, success, and places for continued improvement.

The key thing is make sure you take the time to set the baseline when you start with screenshots, sales and analytics from the website. As a Social Media Manager, you are responsible for communicating the value you are creating.  Make sure you get all the key information from the beginning (which can be a challenge a times).  We go into this more extensively in our Social Media Management training but I hope you got a few ideas that are useful and would love to hear your comments below.

by Martin Brossman and Karen Tiede 

Learn more about the Social Media Certificate Training at http://MySocialMediaMastery.com 

Social Media Job Titles Defined

Social Media JobsSix Social Media Roles: Is This a Position For You?
The vast world of social media offers several different roles depending on business size. Understanding the business audience is the first step in developing a solid social media plan and then fleshing it out with content. But whose job is it to determine audience type and who develops content? Who manages the business’ social media platforms and ensures a consistent message is bringing a positive return on investment (ROI)? Who reports to business leaders?

Online Community Manager:
The primary voice of the company to the outside world is the online community manager. Outreach may include press releases, blogs, website content, social media content, review sites, and forums. By awareness of a company’s online reputation, you will address complaints professionally and timely, and voice appreciation of positive remarks. You will either define the voice of the company or take a predefined voice and ensure consistency and professionalism. Part of your job is to shape the interaction of people within a community, such as matching a support person with a consumer who needs help.

To be successful you will work closely with the company marketing director to align online goals with overall business goals. You will generate relevant reports to deliver to business leaders to show ROI. Relevant reports will change based on the business. A company heavily invested in customer support will need to see customer satisfaction, number of complaints received and resolved, and ideas for future innovation. However a company more invested in sales will see reports based on lead generation, website visits, and interaction with potential consumers.

Social Media Marketing Manager:
Are you very familiar with the most popular social media platforms and able to easily navigate their never-ending changes? Do you collect social media key performance indicators and analyze that data to measure results? Are you able to responsibly delegate tasks and oversee execution of those tasks in a professional manner? You may fit best in the role of social media marketing manager. You may work closely with a marketing strategist or social media strategist to design a plan based on an event or timeline. You will be in charge of providing content to reach event goals and also evaluating data to monitor results. Understanding your business audience is a must, including the specific social media platforms that they use.

You need to be a creative person, proficient in developing content as well as researching and repurposing relevant content, and excel in engaging consumers online. You will follow the style guidelines of the business to provide consistent voice, style, and “feel” to the created content. You should be comfortable working with a variety of individuals inside of the business including IT (for help with computer needs and potentially website needs), business leaders (to ensure business goals are recognized and met and that the appropriate voice is being used) and employees (for content creation and ideas).

Social Media Strategist:
A social media strategist develops a strategy for compelling content for online audiences, including content on social media, blogs, websites, and press releases. Simply posting cute kitten photos will not convert viewers to buyers on your social media; the content needs to direct people to your website or store front and encourage them to make purchases. You will design a plan based around business goals. As the brand ambassador, you present the company’s brand on social media platforms to engage and generate leads.

What makes a good social media strategist? They are usually goal-oriented people who understand social media audiences and their behavior, and are able to communicate clearly and succinctly with those audiences. You also communicate to business leaders ROI for social media plans, and have a deep understanding of social media data, with a way to track results inside the business.

Social Media Marketing Coordinator:
A social media marketing coordinator could be a combination of a social media strategist and social media manager. You must be adept in designing social media campaigns and developing content for those campaigns which elevates the business brand. Having an intimate knowledge of the social media landscape and an ability to learn new social media platforms as needed is required. You need to thrive in fast paced environments, learn quickly, be self-motivated to learn new things, and be team-oriented. You will work closely with many members of the business to garner ideas for content and you will need to have an excellent ability to listen to consumers and deliver to their needs and desires. You may also be providing photos and videos for your social media accounts.

 Social Media Marketing Consultant:
Are you more interested in working for yourself and consulting other businesses on social media? Do you love the challenge of designing new plans based on each company’s needs and goals, and enjoy working with a wide range of professions? Do you have a excellent understanding of the various social media platforms to develop a solid plan for any type of business? Then social media marketing consultant may be the profession for you!

A consultant is able to step into any company, from arboretum to zoo, bank to hair dresser, and develop a social media plan to help them grow. You need to be a good listener and observer, able to navigate intricacies of each individual business to find things that make it stand out in its area. Working closely with the business manager, owner, or marketing specialist, you provide training on social media platforms from the bottom-up, sometimes creating the business pages for the company and educate on content creation and planning. A consultant’s gig may last for just a few hours, providing a company with ideas and solutions, or it may last a few weeks while the consultant transforms the company’s social media presence. A consultant may also present social media to a group of individuals, such as classes Martin Brossman and Karen Tiede offer.

 Blogger/ Social Media Copywriter:
This position may be included in one of the above or may be a stand-alone, depending on the business size and needs. A social media copywriter writes, reviews, and edits materials such as social media posts, blog posts, website content, press releases, and more. You will work closely with team members across a business to understand goals and the target audience. Superb written and verbal communication skills are required as well as project management and organizational skills. A blogger has to work well under pressure to meet deadlines and adapt quickly and efficiently to the business needs.

As the blogger/copywriter you will likely be providing photography or graphs for your content. Start compiling your stock photography now and treat every day like a photo shoot. Label and organize your photo files so that you can easily recall a photo for content. A basic understanding of a photo editing software is helpful and understanding of a graph developing software, such as Microsoft Excel, is important.

A blogger creates content that engages and attracts readers, often redirecting them to the business website in order to generate leads.

 It is apparent that there are many different types of social media jobs. Depending on the size of the company all or just one may be needed to successfully manage the company’s online presence. If you are knowledgeable in social media and you’re interested in taking your career to the next level, start researching companies who are hiring for these positions to see if it’s a good fit for you. You may also benefit from many classes taught by Martin Brossman and Associates.

by Heather Cutchin Evans – learn more about Heather at: http://www.linkedin.com/in/heathercevans

Learn more about the Social Media Management Training at http://MySocialMediaMastery.com 

Bilingual Social Media Online Marketing Manager

Spanish Speakers in North America

Spanish Speakers in North America

The last US census conducted revealed an astonishing large number of Spanish speakers living within the United States: 53 million. With this number quickly growing by an average 2.2% per year, speaking Spanish has moved from an interesting trait to a mandatory skill. As the Hispanic population in the United States grows, the international love affair with social media simultaneously expands. While the growth of the two is independent of one another, there’s no doubt that there’s a large interaction between the online community and the Spanish-speaking one. As such, the services I can offer you as a bilingual social media manager are invaluable.

Cultural Acknowledgement

As a bilingual social media manager, I bring more than just language skills to the table. Rather, my translations extend beyond simple vocabulary to understanding cultural appropriateness, norms, and expectations. While anyone can look up words in an online translator or dictionary, I can provide your business or organization with the skills necessary to promote a positive relationship with clients and customers. This relationship, that recognizes and incorporates cultural diversity, is essential in creating and maintaining a connection between a business and its consumers.

Essential Skills

In addition to providing culturally relevant information to consumers, I possess the essential skills to getting the job done right. By having fluency in both English and Spanish, I am able to focus on:

  • Creating enticing and shareable content for various social platforms;

  • Integrating social, community-based media business strategies;

  • Creating, monitoring, analyzing, and reporting on social media trends within the Hispanic community; and

  • Acting as a liaison between communication teams, online influencers, and Spanish-speaking communities.

In addition to these cultural and lingual-specific skills, I also have all the know-how of an experienced social media manager. I fully recognize the benefits of guiding and executing strategic social media initiatives, developing and managing viral campaigns, creating and maintaining high-profile channel accounts, understanding how to grow a brand’s social presence through paid and organic means, and maintaining an influencer-level profile across key social media platforms.

Conflict Resolution and Improved Communication

A bilingual social media manager is beneficial within the workplace–not only can I help you to create a business culture that recognizes and appreciates diversity, but I’m also an effective tool in conflict resolution and communication improvement.  With a bilingual social media manager, miscommunication and misunderstandings are no longer a cause for concern. When there is a problem in the workplace, the problem can be exacerbated by a language barrier. I can help to coach clients and employees through conflict resolution, as well help promote direct communication.

Translating between English and Spanish

Translating between English and Spanish

 

Additional Benefits

A bilingual social media manger acts as the social media voice for the organization or business, and cultivates new communities and manages branded online communities. By running reports and translating metrics and data into useable information, I’ll help to guide the overall communication strategy of the brand. Additionally, I promise to engage in and lead a community of social media followers across all platforms. In conclusion, a monolingual social media manager can no longer be considered the most effective means of creating and maintain meaningful social media; rather, a bilingual social media manager provides the cultural expertise and language know-how to accomplish the task at hand; I will provide your organization with both.

by Olga Santo Tomás Monroe   919-604-0104   olgamaria3@aol.com

Creating a Social Media Marketing Plan

Social Media Marketing PlanSocial media plays a critical part of any successful online marketing plan. Learning how to efficiently structure your social media plan can help you increase brand awareness while driving customer engagement. Below are some tips to help you get started on customizing your own plan of action.

Understand What Social Media Is

Often times, executives and business owners struggle to understand the value of social media and the positive effect it could have on their business as well as their bottom line.

Today, social media plays a more central role in online marketing strategies. “Social” can engage a business’ target audience, increase brand awareness and generate publicity. Social media marketing can also be used for brand building, reputation management, customer feedback, community building and customer conversions.

Social media, when done with intention, is about having meaningful conversations. By starting and maintaining a dialogue with your target audience, you can better serve them.

Know the Vision and Mission of the Business and Make It Come to Life

What is the business about that will other people would want to talk about? Beyond making money, what else are you here for? An ideal mission statement is clear and simple enough to keep alive. For example, Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. A guiding statement is kept alive by the owners referring to it and leading from it.

A clear mission statement will serve as a beacon and touchstone for all marketing efforts, and in particular, for designing your presence on the social platforms.

Know Your Goals and Milestones

The start of any successful social media marketing plan is outlining your goals, or the problem to be solved.
What do you want to achieve? Do you want to use social media for customer service? Are you trying to network with other companies? Do you want to use social media to help re-brand your business?

Taking the time to think through specific goals will help you lay the groundwork to social media marketing success.

Know Your Target Market and Define Avatars

Social media allows you to market directly to your target consumers on the same social channels that they use every day.  Do you know where your customers spend the most time online? Facebook? Twitter? Pinterest?

Take the time to develop avatars of several types of clients or prospects (3 to 10). A clear example used in politics is Soccer Moms vs Hockey Moms. An ideal avatar is defined so clearly that someone else could identity your customer at a party after talking to them a few minutes.

You also need to know who your negative-customer is as well. Who do you want to repel or send to the competition? Who are the people that complain easily and consume 80 percent of your time? If you can define avatars for these customers, you can design marketing that will NOT attract them to your business.

Post engaging, unique or other shareable items that your target demographic would find appealing, and don’t forget to engage with the people who comment on and like your posts!

Know Your Budget

A solid social media marketing strategy requires two things: time and money. Exactly how much of either depends on the size of your business as well as the size of the audience you are trying to reach. Consider the following:

Time

Who will be maintaining your social accounts? Consider how much time will be required to invest in the ongoing management of the various social media accounts that you create. Will you have this much time, or would it be better if you hired an outside social media marketing expert?

Money

Is your business big enough to hire a social media professional?

If you’ve determined that you don’t have the time to manage multiple social media accounts, consider hiring an expert. Outsourcing your social media marketing may save you both time and money as well as help you meet your social marketing goals.

Look at your budget and establish how much money you have to spend on marketing. How much can be invested in social media?

Know Your Social Networks

If your company is mainly a B2B firm, focus on LinkedIn, Google+, and Slideshare. B2C companies often focus on Facebook and Pinterest. Both sides of the business divide need to pay attention to Google+ and the Google Business Pages.

Determine a Frequency for Posting

How often should you post new content to social networks?
Posting too much to your social networks is almost as bad as not posting enough. In the beginning, it will take some trial and error to figure out how much is too much versus too little.

Use cues from your audience to see what sorts of content resonates (ex: people ‘liking’ or commenting on posts or re-sharing). Look for content posting patterns that may have led to unlikes or unfollows.

Consider the timing and who will see your posts

Most platforms offer analytics information that can help you determine when your followers are on-line and more likely to see your posts and updates. 50% of your exposure on Facebook, for example, happens in the 30 minutes after you share. If your viewers aren’t online at that time, they won’t see your updates.

Create a calendar

Putting together a content calendar is one of the best ways to organize your total social media marketing plan as well as keep track of what things you’ve tried. A content calendar can also serve as a sounding board, helping you come up with new ideas to better market the business.

There is no one way to write up a social media content calendar. However, some of the basic things you’ll want to include in your calendar are:

  • Months, noting special events, seasonal information, and holidays that matter in your business.
  • Blog Post Titles
  • Content Titles
  • Date and place where content was published
  • Social Sites, along with an indication of what type of content was posted to each social site

Get as detailed as you want with your calendar. For example, some companies will stratify their information even further to include line items such as: keywords, title tags, names of authors who wrote content, who content was last approved by, and other detailed information.

When going through your social media content calendar, be aware of where you are publishing information as well as what type of information you are publishing. For example, Pinterest, Instagram, and Facebook are predominantly visual, so images may get more engagement than written content. If you do post written content, be sure that it is connected to a relevant image.

Measure Success

In addition to having a social media marketing content calendar, you should also include a separate spreadsheet to formulate Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). KPIs are formulas that help you measure success in your marketing efforts.
It’s not enough to join a social network and post information. You need to have a way to measure how this information is (or isn’t) reaching its intended audience.

Ideally, you should have KPIs that are quantitative as well as qualitative. While quantitative results are important, make an effort to look at qualitative results as well. These results will show you how people feel about your brand and the information you are posting.

Some social networks produce their own metrics, including Facebook, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. Once you’ve established what your KPIs are, create a spreadsheet, and decide how often you’ll update it with metrics. Some companies may choose to update their KPI spreadsheet on a weekly basis, monthly basis or even quarterly.

Don’t forget to take advantage of Google Analytics to see which social sites are top referrers to your business. Google Analytics can be a wealth of information for any business to help you see what is or isn’t working with your social media marketing plan.

Have the flexibility to change the plan and update it based on events and feedback you gain.

We welcome your comments and response. What have you learned about having a Social Media plan? What have you learned by not having a Social Media plan?
by Martin Brossman and Karen Tiede
Learn more about our Social Media Management Training at: http://MySocialMediaMastery.com

Repurposing Content and Content Curation

Repurposing Content and Content CurationWe live in a digital age, where information is no longer found through the phone book or word-of-mouth; rather, people get their information from the Internet, primarily using search engines such as Google. Because of this Internet phenomenon, having an online presence as a business is the best possible strategy for marketing your company and services. However, not everyone is a natural writer and not everything needs a blog post. Repurposing content and content curation can be a great way to share valuable information to your customers and prospective customers through your website. Here’s how to create meaningful content that’s been repurposed:

What Exactly is Content Curation?
Content curation refers to the process of finding already existing content and organizing that content in a way that’s relevant to your customers or potential customers. Oftentimes, content curation can involve using very similar content but on a new medium, hence the name “repurposing” content, or giving the content a new purpose. Creating high quality repurposed content involves more than just using already existing content, though; high-quality content will also add new information, a new perspective, or new relevant questions.

What’s the Point of Content Curation?
Content curation is a marketing tool that’s used by companies for their blogs or websites. The point of content curation is to provide valuable information to your customers or potential customers by cutting down the time they spend sifting through useless information. By using content curation, you create content that provides important information to site visitors that’s easy to find and navigate.

 How Does Content Curation Work?
Content curation has three primary aspects that go into its creation, which are filtering, analysis, and social rating. Each of these three things can be done either manually or automatically, depending upon the technology that you have access to.

Filtering: Filtering is exactly what is sounds like—choosing material (either through personal preference, votes and views from a social community, or due to the information’s relevance) that should be included in future content based on its current effectiveness.

Analysis: Semantic analysis is the process of looking at a problem and finding information and relationships between existing information that answer that problem. For example, if the problem is “How do I explain my product?” then semantic analysis looks at content to ensure that it’s solving the problem by examining the relationship between statements, facts, and sources in the content.

Social Rating: Social rating simply means that the content that you choose for repurposing was chosen based on the fact that it received a high social rating. This is usually used for social media sites, like Facebook.

When you’re attempting to repurpose content for your own blog or website, the most important aspect you should focus on is filtering already existing information, and adding new, relevant content, too. Use hyperlinks, incorporate multimedia, address the problem, and make a schedule for yourself of when you’ll be posting.

Why You Should Repurpose and Curate Content

Copying and pasting old information into a new blog post simply for the sake of having something on your website isn’t helpful—it doesn’t provide customers with any new information whatsoever.

What is helpful, however, is taking bits and pieces of old information and making it new and exciting for those who visit your site/blog. A great example of repurposing content was Martin Brossman’s Hangout-On-Air with David Amerland about “What’s Beyond Interruption Advertising?” When Brossman went to put the information on his blog, it would have been really easy to just transcribe the dialogue. Instead, though, Brossman added new, free content and ideas that he learned in the interview, and organized it in an easy-to-navigate and relevant fashion.

Essentially, your job is to find content that you think is meaningful, and then to explain why it’s meaningful to your customers. By doing so, you’ll be creating a website or blog with a strong online presence, you’ll drive more traffic to your site, and you’ll be providing customers and potential customers with what they need.

by Olga Santo Tomás Monroe   919-604-0104   olgamaria3@aol.com    Social Media Marketing and Management
Connect to me on G+: https://plus.google.com/+OlgaSantoTom%C3%A1sMonroe/posts

Learn more about the Social Media Management Certification Program at: http://MySocialMediaMastery.com

Social Media Policy For Businesses

Are you empowering your people to surf or are you still trying to control the ocean?

Social Media Policy

Do you empower your people to use Social Media?

As social media becomes more integrated into our daily life, it is difficult to regulate employees. Too often, businesses shy away from social media. However, businesses fail to realize each employee is creating an impression of your business by what they are saying about you online. In many cases, what your employees say casually might not be the impression you want your company to project. It is easier to have clear guidelines than to try to control every action.

A social media policy is every bit as important to the company as any other policy. In fact, your social media policy should be part of your corporate culture.

The most famous example of this is the seven-word policy used by Zappos: “Be Real and Use Your Best Judgment.” While this policy is too simplistic for most companies, Zappos is able to make it work by incorporating it into every part of their corporate culture.

One employee with a bad attitude or a bad sense of humor can have a negative effect on entire brand or the “personality of your business.” The wrong type of exposure online can ruin anyone’s business.

The best way to protect your business from inappropriate social media exposure is with a social media policy. Here’s what you need to be aware of in order to create a good social media policy.

Identify What is Proprietary Information

Every business has information that cannot be discussed with outsiders. This could be a special process, a secret recipe or client details. A good social media policy will spell out exactly what type of information is confidential and not to be shared.

Make clear that logos, trademarks, company signatures, and company uniforms should not be used in images and posts unless actually speaking for the company.

Infringing on someone else’s copyrights or trademarks should also be discussed. In many cases, people don’t understand that they are infringing.  Ignorance is neither an excuse nor a defense.

Spell Out Any Moral Clauses

Many businesses have ‘moral clauses’ in their employment contracts. Be clear about the type of content that is not acceptable to post on the business’ social media sites.  What is offensive to your company might not be offensive to your employee.

If your industry deals with children or other special groups, you might have additional clauses in your social media policy.

Designate A Company Spokesperson

A Social Media spokesperson is the go-to person for any questions regarding what is and is not appropriate online. Companies with a designated social media spokespeople find that they have far fewer social media gaffes than those without one.

Encourage People To Be Civil Online

It’s not just what people say online, it’s how they say it. You don’t want an employee to purposely offending others.  Encourage people to be civil to others online, even when they disagree with what’s posted.

Some businesses require pre-approval, or two sets of eyes, on responses to negative reviews and other difficult content.

Be Aware Of What’s Protected Speech

It’s common for people to complain about their jobs online. After all, social media is the new water cooler. When a company finds statements such as “I hate my job” or “my boss is a jerk” online, one natural impulse is to fire that employee.  So many companies did fire employees for posting negative statements on their personal accounts, in fact, that the courts have ruled some of this as “protected speech.”

There are two kinds of work bashing that are considered protected speech online: venting and discussing.

Venting is loosely defined as someone complaining to let off stream. As long as they don’t give away any proprietary information, or engage in “instigating speech,” employees are permitted to post content in this category without repercussions.

Discussing wages or working conditions with other employees or outsiders in an effort to improve wages and working conditions is considered “union activities,” and is governed by the National Labor Relations Act.  This is true even if your business or industry does not have a union.

Educate Employees

When and where an employee can post should also be spelled out. Are they allowed to post from work? How about a work related event or retreat?

Discuss Consequences

A rule without a consequence is just a suggestion. The same is true with your social media policy. Without consequences properly spelled out, no one will take your policy seriously.

Are all offenses treated the same? Is one offense enough to be fired or does your company have a “three strikes and you’re out” rule? Whatever the rules, whatever the consequence, make sure your employees know and agree to them.

Conclusion

When social media is used correctly, employees can help spread the word about your company and build your brand. The key to making this happen is to have the right policies in place. A good Social Media Policy will encourage polite, respectful interaction without disclosing confidential information of the company or your clients. A social media policy is not just a nice thing for businesses to have, it’s a necessity.

by Martin Brossman and Karen Tiede 

Learn more about their Social Media Management Certificate program:
http://MySocialMediaMastery.com

Special thanks to Mercedes Tabano II for research.

Strategy for Social Media Marketing Management

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Word for the Day: Webcare

Rather than women or Internet-savvy youths, older men are the most likely demographic group to complain online.

“Webcare” is the translation of a Dutch word that means “using social media to do customer support.”

Graphic from Olga ter Voert from TNS NIPO showing where people post reviews, by motivation.

Graphic from Olga ter Voert from TNS NIPO showing where people post reviews, by motivation.


Click on the image to go to the original post.

The Social Media Prism

The Conversation Prism v. 3

The Conversation Prism gives you a whole view of the social media universe, categorized and also organized by how people use each network. V 3.0 introduces new groups and networks and also removes those networks no longer in play. Use the Conversation Prism to see what you’re missing!

Click on the image to go to the website where you can see more posters about social media.

Your competition works for … bees?

The Johannesburg Zoo has a tweeting Honey Badger.

Ferocious.  Relentless.  Extremely thick-skinned.

Perfect for the position of social media manager.

Honey Badgers eat bees, among other things I don’t want to eat.

The tweeting badger from the Johannesburg Zoo.

The tweeting badger from the Johannesburg Zoo.

Apparently, the badger is selective about whom he follows.

If you do social media management for a zoo or animal rescue group, think about how you can use the Honey Badger example in your organization