Repurposing Content and Content Curation

Repurposing Content and Content CurationWe live in a digital age, where information is no longer found through the phone book or word-of-mouth; rather, people get their information from the Internet, primarily using search engines such as Google. Because of this Internet phenomenon, having an online presence as a business is the best possible strategy for marketing your company and services. However, not everyone is a natural writer and not everything needs a blog post. Repurposing content and content curation can be a great way to share valuable information to your customers and prospective customers through your website. Here’s how to create meaningful content that’s been repurposed:

What Exactly is Content Curation?
Content curation refers to the process of finding already existing content and organizing that content in a way that’s relevant to your customers or potential customers. Oftentimes, content curation can involve using very similar content but on a new medium, hence the name “repurposing” content, or giving the content a new purpose. Creating high quality repurposed content involves more than just using already existing content, though; high-quality content will also add new information, a new perspective, or new relevant questions.

What’s the Point of Content Curation?
Content curation is a marketing tool that’s used by companies for their blogs or websites. The point of content curation is to provide valuable information to your customers or potential customers by cutting down the time they spend sifting through useless information. By using content curation, you create content that provides important information to site visitors that’s easy to find and navigate.

 How Does Content Curation Work?
Content curation has three primary aspects that go into its creation, which are filtering, analysis, and social rating. Each of these three things can be done either manually or automatically, depending upon the technology that you have access to.

Filtering: Filtering is exactly what is sounds like—choosing material (either through personal preference, votes and views from a social community, or due to the information’s relevance) that should be included in future content based on its current effectiveness.

Analysis: Semantic analysis is the process of looking at a problem and finding information and relationships between existing information that answer that problem. For example, if the problem is “How do I explain my product?” then semantic analysis looks at content to ensure that it’s solving the problem by examining the relationship between statements, facts, and sources in the content.

Social Rating: Social rating simply means that the content that you choose for repurposing was chosen based on the fact that it received a high social rating. This is usually used for social media sites, like Facebook.

When you’re attempting to repurpose content for your own blog or website, the most important aspect you should focus on is filtering already existing information, and adding new, relevant content, too. Use hyperlinks, incorporate multimedia, address the problem, and make a schedule for yourself of when you’ll be posting.

Why You Should Repurpose and Curate Content

Copying and pasting old information into a new blog post simply for the sake of having something on your website isn’t helpful—it doesn’t provide customers with any new information whatsoever.

What is helpful, however, is taking bits and pieces of old information and making it new and exciting for those who visit your site/blog. A great example of repurposing content was Martin Brossman’s Hangout-On-Air with David Amerland about “What’s Beyond Interruption Advertising?” When Brossman went to put the information on his blog, it would have been really easy to just transcribe the dialogue. Instead, though, Brossman added new, free content and ideas that he learned in the interview, and organized it in an easy-to-navigate and relevant fashion.

Essentially, your job is to find content that you think is meaningful, and then to explain why it’s meaningful to your customers. By doing so, you’ll be creating a website or blog with a strong online presence, you’ll drive more traffic to your site, and you’ll be providing customers and potential customers with what they need.

by Olga Santo Tomás Monroe   919-604-0104   olgamaria3@aol.com    Social Media Marketing and Management
Connect to me on G+: https://plus.google.com/+OlgaSantoTom%C3%A1sMonroe/posts

Learn more about the Social Media Management Certification Program at: http://smmcp.wpengine.com

Social Media Policy For Businesses

Are you empowering your people to surf or are you still trying to control the ocean?

Social Media Policy

Do you empower your people to use Social Media?

As social media becomes more integrated into our daily life, it is difficult to regulate employees. Too often, businesses shy away from social media. However, businesses fail to realize each employee is creating an impression of your business by what they are saying about you online. In many cases, what your employees say casually might not be the impression you want your company to project. It is easier to have clear guidelines than to try to control every action.

A social media policy is every bit as important to the company as any other policy. In fact, your social media policy should be part of your corporate culture.

The most famous example of this is the seven-word policy used by Zappos: “Be Real and Use Your Best Judgment.” While this policy is too simplistic for most companies, Zappos is able to make it work by incorporating it into every part of their corporate culture.

One employee with a bad attitude or a bad sense of humor can have a negative effect on entire brand or the “personality of your business.” The wrong type of exposure online can ruin anyone’s business.

The best way to protect your business from inappropriate social media exposure is with a social media policy. Here’s what you need to be aware of in order to create a good social media policy.

Identify What is Proprietary Information

Every business has information that cannot be discussed with outsiders. This could be a special process, a secret recipe or client details. A good social media policy will spell out exactly what type of information is confidential and not to be shared.

Make clear that logos, trademarks, company signatures, and company uniforms should not be used in images and posts unless actually speaking for the company.

Infringing on someone else’s copyrights or trademarks should also be discussed. In many cases, people don’t understand that they are infringing.  Ignorance is neither an excuse nor a defense.

Spell Out Any Moral Clauses

Many businesses have ‘moral clauses’ in their employment contracts. Be clear about the type of content that is not acceptable to post on the business’ social media sites.  What is offensive to your company might not be offensive to your employee.

If your industry deals with children or other special groups, you might have additional clauses in your social media policy.

Designate A Company Spokesperson

A Social Media spokesperson is the go-to person for any questions regarding what is and is not appropriate online. Companies with a designated social media spokespeople find that they have far fewer social media gaffes than those without one.

Encourage People To Be Civil Online

It’s not just what people say online, it’s how they say it. You don’t want an employee to purposely offending others.  Encourage people to be civil to others online, even when they disagree with what’s posted.

Some businesses require pre-approval, or two sets of eyes, on responses to negative reviews and other difficult content.

Be Aware Of What’s Protected Speech

It’s common for people to complain about their jobs online. After all, social media is the new water cooler. When a company finds statements such as “I hate my job” or “my boss is a jerk” online, one natural impulse is to fire that employee.  So many companies did fire employees for posting negative statements on their personal accounts, in fact, that the courts have ruled some of this as “protected speech.”

There are two kinds of work bashing that are considered protected speech online: venting and discussing.

Venting is loosely defined as someone complaining to let off stream. As long as they don’t give away any proprietary information, or engage in “instigating speech,” employees are permitted to post content in this category without repercussions.

Discussing wages or working conditions with other employees or outsiders in an effort to improve wages and working conditions is considered “union activities,” and is governed by the National Labor Relations Act.  This is true even if your business or industry does not have a union.

Educate Employees

When and where an employee can post should also be spelled out. Are they allowed to post from work? How about a work related event or retreat?

Discuss Consequences

A rule without a consequence is just a suggestion. The same is true with your social media policy. Without consequences properly spelled out, no one will take your policy seriously.

Are all offenses treated the same? Is one offense enough to be fired or does your company have a “three strikes and you’re out” rule? Whatever the rules, whatever the consequence, make sure your employees know and agree to them.

Conclusion

When social media is used correctly, employees can help spread the word about your company and build your brand. The key to making this happen is to have the right policies in place. A good Social Media Policy will encourage polite, respectful interaction without disclosing confidential information of the company or your clients. A social media policy is not just a nice thing for businesses to have, it’s a necessity.

by Martin Brossman and Karen Tiede 

Learn more about their Social Media Management Certificate program:
http://smmcp.wpengine.com

Special thanks to Mercedes Tabano II for research.

Social Media Help in Raleigh

Would you like some social media help? If you’re in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area of North Carolina, you could attend one of our classes taught at Wake Tech’s Small Business Center, or the Center for Excellence.

Or you could contact us for one on one coaching, small or large group training. We do in-person, and online – where we share a computer screen remotely and are on the phone together.

If you would like the best value around, we’re getting ready to share our most condensed and comprehensive social media training, in a Monday night course in Pittsboro. The low price and the value of what you will learn make a drive worth your time. It’s a social media boot camp of a kind, only you get to learn over time, having time to practice, apply and absorb the content. We’ll have video support for technical aspects of the class. And participants will choose a social media project to work on and get help with during the 14 weeks.

More about the Social Media Management training program: Spring 2013 Social Media Management training program.

Social Media is constantly changing, and there’s so much to understand about it in order to feel comfortable and know you’re doing as well as anyone could do. Needing help is not a sign of failure or weakness, it is simply recognition that collaborating with someone else could give you more perspective and clarify what you’re doing and why.

Email info@martinbrossmanandassociates.com with a little bit about yourself, and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible.